Thursday, March 1, 2012

How I Make Chalk Paint

I was definitely craving some fresh color on this one!
She looks like Spring, don't you think?


I found this china cabinet at a local thrift store. I was so excited because I'm running out of furniture! It's getting harder to find good pieces and prices are going through the roof, but that's a post for another day. It was a Friday and they were planning to rearrange the entire store over the weekend. Some of the heaviest pieces were marked way down in hopes of selling them before they had to move them. I was lucky enough to be in the right spot at the right time!
 
 


I've been wanting to paint a piece in a color similar to Duck Egg Blue. I was actually tempted to buy chalk paint again, but fortunately I was shopping with Megan and she reminded me that I can make my own Duck Egg Blue. Of course she was right! So I took my chalk paint sample chart to Home Depot and picked the closest shade in the Behr paint and primer in one. I have had really good luck with this paint and it is very reasonably priced. The color is Lotus Leaf.



It's been a few months now since I first starting making my own chalk paint. Recipes are all over the blogs and there are all sorts of variations. I've been experimenting and I think I've settled on a recipe that consistently works well for me. My basic recipe is ... three parts paint to one part dissolved Plaster of Paris.



You do not have to measure precisely and here's an easy way to do it. Mark four equal lines on a clear plastic container. Add Plaster of Paris to reach the very first line. Then add warm water, about a tablespoon at a time, until the Plaster of Paris is nice and smooth. Keep stirring - you don't want any lumps or grit. With the Plaster of Paris dissolved, you'll be a bit above the first line, but not by much. Once the Plaster of Paris is completely dissolved, fill to the top line with paint and again stir well. *Again, your goal is an approximate ratio of three parts paint to one part dissolved Plaster of Paris. Super easy!

*** Be sure to dissolve the Plaster of Paris before adding the paint or you'll end up with grit. And different brands of paint are thicker than others, so just adjust as needed. Add more water or more paint until you have a consistency that feels right to you. And just like regular chalk paint, the homemade version will thicken as it sits. Give it a stir a few times throughout the painting process. Have fun and experiment!


And since it's still too cold to paint outside or even in the garage, I'm living dangerously and painting in my sunroom. It's nice and warm and the light is fabulous!



Yup, I'm a wild child I tell you!


And here she is all done and not a spill in sight.
Well, maybe there were a few little splatters, shhh!



And no matter what kind of paint I'm using, I still like to go over the entire piece with a sanding sponge. It's a good opportunity to give your piece a once over before you start painting and you just end up with a smoother finish. And to finish up, a coat of wax adds a nice luster.










I also love the way chalk paint adheres to hardware - a huge plus in my book!





I painted the inside white with an oops paint. There are shelves too of course, but I didn't want to put them in for photos and have to take them back out again for moving. This baby is sooo heavy and I didn't want to risk scratching the inside.


I am so thrilled with the way this china cabinet turned out! She would look so fresh and pretty in a dining room, kitchen or even a bathroom. And can't you just picture her in a little girl's room filled with books and stuffed animals ~ so sweet!



*And many of you noticed that I removed that little line of gold trim from the inside of the glass doors. It came off easily with a little razor blade paint scraper from the paint department!

Okay, that's three posts in one day! I don't know what got into me today!


And don't forget to check out all the great links this week at our Be Inspired Link Party! Hope you'll join us every Tuesday!


I'm linking to...




A Diamond in the Stuff

Funky Junk's Sat Nite Special

The Girl CreativeUndertheTableandDreaming


I Heart Nap TimePositively Splendid


PhotobucketPhotobucket

Furniture Feature FridaysMod Vintage Life

PhotobucketThe Shabby Nest

Redoux


My entry into504 Main’s Tickled Pink partysponsored by Appliances OnlineBosch Washing Machines

136 comments:

NanaDiana said...

Sharon, Thanks for sharing your trial and error recipe! It is amazing to me how expensive the chalk paint is. I'm guessing this works the same way...that you wax it to seal it? Does it sand down/distress easily? xo Diana

Chatty Chics said...

THANK you so much! I have tried a DIY chalk paint and had problems. It was with non-sand grout however, not plaster of paris. I've had 2 people today tell me to use this recipe instead!
Your china buffet is beautiful!
Whoo-hoo!
Melody
ChattyChics.com

Elizabeth (Blue Clear Sky) said...

What a beautiful piece with the new paint finish. I was planning to make some chalk paint this weekend so thanks so much for the tips. I have all the supplies now I just need a bit of time.

Korrie@RedHenHome said...

This turned out beautifully! I want to try the Plaster of Paris version, but my Scotch soul reminds me that I have a WHOLE LOT of unsanded tile grout in the garage that I would hate to waste! I guess I need to figure out another use for that ;-)

Cassie @ Primitive & Proper said...

it looks beautiful! i love the shape, details and color! great job!

Cyndi ✪ Blue Star said...

Sharon, I just love this! What a great job! I'm going to have to try out the homemade chalk paint, especially when I want a color that AS doesn't make!

Ann from On Sutton Place said...

She is a beauty for sure! When the weather gets nicer I have a few projects planned and I'm going to make my own chalk paint. This recipe is very easy...you explained the measuring part really well. One question. Where do you get plaster of paris? :o)

Carlene @ Organized Clutter said...

I have to try your recipe! Nice hutch!

Katie said...

It's gorgeous Sharon! I love how your color turned out! Thanks for the tip about adding water to the grout first - I can't wait to try another chalk paint piece!

Rosemary@villabarnes said...

That's a very pretty color. Nice job.

Chrissie said...

Your cabinet is beautiful and I love the color!

Charm Bracelet Diva said...

Thank you for your recipe!

Something Nice and Pretty said...

It's beautiful! I made the chalk paint too but I'll have to try mixing the Plaster of Paris with the water first, thanks for the tip!

Rondell

Ali Richardson said...

Oh boy Sharon!! That thing came straight from my dreams! Perfection :)

Barbe@ Beez Rental Designs said...

This is beautiful! I love how the changes depend on the light when you took the pic. I so love robins egg blue and would love a bedroom in that color. Hmmmm, it just might work with my fabric; thanks you have my mind reeling! : )
I'm a new follower and hope you'll come join me and post this beauty on my first linky party, Frugal Treasures Tuesday. I found you on Show and Tell Friday. Thanks again for sharing, I'm on my way to check out your party.

Emily said...

i love it! the color is so perfectly spring!! and thank you for sharing the cp recipe! ive been wanting to make my own and i know i can trust that if you say it works, it works!!

SheilaG @ Plum Doodles said...

Your cabinet is beautiful! Thanks so much for explaining how you mix the chalk paint. I've seen the recipes but didn't know about mixing water into the plaster of paris first- good tip! (I've seen lots of people use the sanded grout recipe, thinking it was for chalk paint, but it's actually for chalkboard paint.)

MadAnne said...

I made chalk paint for the first time last week. I put the paint in the container then added plaster of Paris. What a mess of lumps. If only I had read your mixing directions. So what to do with this lumpy mess? I pulled out my immersion blender and wow, smooth, creamy chalk paint. Shh!

Lee Hill Primitives said...

Beautiful piece! Great Job. Thanks for sharing rthis. Where you find Plaster of Paris? I asked in Michael and Hobby Lobby but they don't have it.

Twice Nice said...

Perfect color for that piece! Have you tried the homemade chalk paint with a darker color yet? I'm curious if the plaster ends up lightening the paint much. I've been trying the unsanded grout, but think we have some plaster around here so I'm going to give this a try! Thanks for sharing your recipe!

Imperfections said...

I guess I'm missing something with the chalk paint. Do I not have to prime?

Connie @ Sensible-Redesign said...

Beautiful piece. I know what you mean about right place right time. That is exactly what the secret is. I am going to try your recipe for Chalk paint this am. I have done it before but didn't do the water and Plaster of Paris first, and it was very grainy.

Stacey said...

I love the color...you did an awesome job! Does it matter what kind of paint you use for the recipe...meaning do you need high gloss or flat? I recently ordered my first chalk paint...waiting on it to come in. I wish I had seen your post before I ordered:/

Mimi said...

Love the elongated top of this hutch. the paint color is perfect for it too.

~ ~ Ahrisha ~ ~ said...

Brilliant you are with your mixing instructions. Thanks for sharing you just saved us all a bundle of money. Gotta love that. Oh, and I am a new follower.
~ ~Ahrisha~ ~

Kim @ A Brush of Whimsy said...

It's so pretty, Sharon!

Haverford House said...

This cabinet is beautiful, the color is perfect! Thanks for sharing your recipe, I am going to try it! ~Marcy

Haverford House said...

This cabinet is beautiful, the color is perfect! Thanks for sharing your recipe, I am going to try it! ~Marcy

The Other Me Is Sane said...

thanks for your chalk paint recipe. I've been using gesso to make my own chalk paint, but I think I'll try your version as I think it will be cheaper. thanks again for the inspiration to get something done this weekend!

Beth said...

Came out beautiful!Love your color choice~!! I was just at HD looking for a match to Duck Egg, how funny! I too make my own chalk paint. But thanks so much for mentioning to mix the plaster with the water first! sometimes the grittiness gets in the way when I'm painting. They sand off, but it's just more work. In answer to some of the other posts....Plaster of Paris is avail at HD for about 5 bucks (I think Michaels has it too). I have used everything from flat to hi-gloss. Doesn't matter...it all turns out flat. (I've even mixed flat and gloss paints together) I prime if I'm going over fresh raw wood, but I guess you don't have to. I like to sand between coats. Gives it a really smooth finish. My ratio is 2 parts paint to 1 part plaster. I've found that if you use more paint, it's harder to sand and distress.

jeannie maxwell said...

Wow. Looks amazing. I have my ingredients just have to find the time! Thanks again!

The Retail DiYet said...

I never even thought of making my own...how crafty! I love the color and the piece! -Danielle

Jennifer @ Town and Country Living said...

That's a beautiful hutch. Love the color!

Amy @ Positively Splendid said...

This turned out so lovely! I need to try my hand at chalk paint! Thanks so much for linking up this week. :)

PeonyJo said...

just lovely! Was dying to try the ASCP but my budget won't allow for such...your recipes will fit my wallet nicely. What kind of wax did you use? any other tips on distressing inthis style before I jump in with my 2 left feet?
Blesings,
PeonyJo

Anne said...

does your chalk paint scratch off?? I must have added too much water or something to mine cause it's not adhering!!! Aaaaah!

Kathy @ Creative Home Expressions said...

She turned out lovely, Sharon! I love that you mixed your own paint. I just got the free quart of paint at Ace yesterday and thought I'd try mixing my own since I saw we have plaster of paris in the garage. Fingers crossed I can get it right! I figured if it's a fail it didn't really cost me anything. I will definitely try your instructions of mixing the water first though.

Elyse said...

A few things...
-Great find! And yes, I agree with you that good pieces are becoming hard to find and people are way too proud of them!
-Love the color and that you made your own chalk paint!
-I must try to make some because I spend way too much on ASCP.
-So glad I found your blog at My Romantic Home.

http://shabbysweettea.com

Janette - The2Seasons said...

We made our own chalk paint, too, and had great success on a hutch. The blue shade that you made is beautiful!!

KellyMellyBoBellyBananaFanna said...

i'm going to try this chalk paint! thanks!

Heather said...

Saw this at This Girl creative Linky party and had to stop by for a better look and say hello! Wow - love this color and how the makeover turned out too. I am pinning this - I have been wanting to try chalk paint for a while but keep hearing how expensive it is. This tutorial is great! Three questions: What type of sanding block do you use to do the final sand, did you sand at all as an initial step and what brand name of wax do you us? (I am new to all this sorry!). I am your newest follower. Please visit my blog and say hello! I love to make new bloggy friends, comments and followers too :)
Heather @ settingforfour.blogspot.com

Jen Lossing said...

What a lovely piece. I love the color you choose. I haven't worked with chalk paint yet and really want to. I debate buying some or making my own??

alane said...

YOu did an amazing job...I love the bluishness. Aqua anyway, it is love....

Lolly Jane said...

Looks great! XO

Sandy Ang said...

Such a wonderfully fresh, new look ! Great transformation

Andrea said...

This is beautiful? Love the color. My attempt at chalk paint didn't go so well. I think I'll give yours a try!

Sherry @ No Minimalist Here said...

Sharon, Love the color and the cabinet turned out wonderful!
xo, Sherry

gail said...

your buffet/hutch turned out sooo pretty!
I've made my own chalk paint, wrote down exactly how I did it. Have I blogged it yet? nope! I'm a bad blogger!
thanks for linking up to catch as catch can!
gail

Susan Catney said...

Love the hutch. It came out great! One question - how did you get the gold off of the glass? It totally gave the piece a different look (it looks so much better gone!) Great job!

Good Time Charlie said...

Just gorgeous! I can't believe you were able to make paint that looks that good! Thanks for sharing! -K

Holly Lefevre said...

I just posted on FB about how I cannot find inexpensive "finds" like I keep reading about - bummer...Oh well, I will take what I can get! I must try this...I have not tried chalk paint at all and am do intrigued! Sharing this on Tickled pink.

Love Of Quilts said...

The buffet is beautiful!

Danielle said...

Your hutch is beautiful.

Suzanne@Meridian Road said...

Sharon, it's gorgeous! I LOVE the color, and the white inside. Thanks for sharing your recipe and all your tips!

Auntie Ann said...

How did you get your hardware to have such beautiful coverage? did you do anything to it before you applied the paint?

Lolly Jane said...

Yes she looks like a spring piece... and one that belongs in MY house! lol Great job, Sharon! This is simply gorgeous! I've been wanting to try this painting method- pinning it for future use ;) Thanks for the inspiration!!

XOXO

Rani @ La Maison Jolie said...

Absolutely beautiful! I am your newest follower!!!! Rani

Elizabeth (Blue Clear Sky) said...

I'm back to say that this is the recipe I use now and love it. I have painted several pieces including a little white maple desk, some night tables, a bench and now I'm working on a small pedestal drop leaf table. Thanks so much for the tutorial.

Somewhere In the World said...

Does it matter what sheen of pain you use? I have some black that is satin and too shiny for me, if I mix it do you think it would tone down and work?

Our Pinteresting Family said...

So glad I got to see this piece in person today! It's gorgeous!! Megan

Obama Chatroom said...

Is there tips on brushes to use? How to sand to distress and what type of wax to use for a shiny finish?
Thanks

Obama Chatroom said...

Hi, I am getting ready to try this but need some more info.
Are there tips any where on how to get a distressed shiny finish any where? Like type of paint, type brush, kind of sandpaper and what type wax......Appreciate any help

Chiwei @ One Dog Woof said...

Beautiful! I'll be attempting my first big furniture repaint this weekend, so I like the idea of the home made chalk paint. What's the difference between normal paint and chalk paint? And how do you apply the winwax finishing wax? Thanks for sharing!

www.1dogwoof.com

Claiming Our Space said...

I came across your blog when I was searching for "diy chalk paint." I just finished my first piece yesterday and your "recipe" works great. I think my favorite part, other than the final look, was being able to paint several coats, lightly sand and seal my end table in one day! Thanks for sharing!

Amy Sarah said...

Thank you! I just came across this. I have two black end tables that are in rough shape and need to be redone. I've not been relishing the thought of stripping them, so a friend recommended chalk paint. The problem is that the nearest retailers it are at least 2 hours away. So many of the other recipes said to mix in the plaster until it "looks right". Having never seen actual chalk paint, it was really refreshing to have someone give a ratio!
When I post my results I'll be sure to link to this page. Thanks again!

Kathryn said...

I am going to attempt doing this to my parent's old hutch to put in my daughters room for storage.
What kind of wax do you use and how do you apply it?

Betty Stapleton said...

looks great, bought the plaster of paris at Home Depot, and going to mix it tomorrow and use it, but what kind of wax do you use. Have been shopping at all stores for a paste wax and can't find any. See that is the question above mine to. Thank you for any help

Judy said...

my question also is about the wax to use to seal the paint. Also- Lowes sells the plaster of paris-4lbs for $6.89--

Restore and Renew said...

Thanks for sharing your recipe. I tried another that called for 3 parts paint to 1 part POP and 1 part water. It was far to runny. Love the china cabinet.
Donna G

ournextgreatadventure said...

Thanks for sharing your recipe!!! I just mixed some of my own this past weekend. My yellow paint was a streaky mess, but the blue and light gray I mixed worked beautifully, so I'm convinced there was a problem with the yellow paint.

Restore and Renew said...

I link this to my latest blog post.
Donna G.

Kristi said...

Thank you for the recipe - I used it today and my pieces turned out perfectly!!

Kristi said...

Thank you fro the recipe I tried it today and it worked perfectly! My pieces turned out great!!

Candace Walker said...

I can't WAIT to do this. Did you find that the paint color holds true once mixing in the Plaster of Paris or should I opt for a darker color, expecting it to lighten after mixing?

Allie B said...

I made up several batches of the Plaster of Paris CP this past weekend. What I found is that most of the paint I mixed it with was eggshell sheen and they mixed up beautifully. I had two other colors that were semi-gloss as they were used in the bathroom. The results were very different and mixing them was not easily done. Additionally, the final product obviously has a different sheen to it. Have you run across this issue?

Also, a big thanks to the person who commented about using an immersion blender. I am so doing that next time!

And, yes, your piece is stunning!! :)

Athena at Minervas Garden said...

Hi Sharon: Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I am such a beginner at painting projects, and I have learned a lot from you and your blog, so thank you! I'm going to try this recipe out on some pots that I would then like to put transfers on, and a little bookcase for our bedroom.

Jennifer Ayres said...

when i first mixed the plaster of paris with water it became rock hard before i could mix the paint in.
my second attempt is super thick. too much plaster of paris, not enough water? what am i doing wrong?

Lynn Fetting said...

I just found a beautiful armoir at Goodwill for a mere 24.95! I was amazed. It needs a little TLC from my handy hubby, and then I will be giving it a beautiful chalk paint treatment. I can't wait. Thank you for the recipe. I'm new to your site and definitely appreciate your wisdom after your trial and errors. Thank you!

Lynn Fetting said...

I just found a beautiful armoir at Goodwill for a mere 24.95! I was amazed. It needs a little TLC from my handy hubby, and then I will be giving it a beautiful chalk paint treatment. I can't wait. Thank you for the recipe. I'm new to your site and definitely appreciate your wisdom after your trial and errors. Thank you!

Crystelle Boutique said...

This is awesome. Thanks for the tips: lines on the container. mix water with plaster of Paris, then add paint. I'll give it a try!
Thank you!

Crystelle
http://www.crystelleboutique.com

Jandi said...

I see that the question has been asked before but I can't find the answer. I am just wondering what type of wax you used and if it was available at HD. This turned out so lovely and I can't wait to start my own project!

Zumi said...

This is so nice and quite helpful. It turned out fabulous :) I like it and I will refer this to my friend. He will love it too. Big thanks for sharing.


Zummi of dmci homes for sale

Andrea Singarella said...

Hello! Thank so much for this post! I was wondering if you could tell me if it matters what finish you buy in the paint? (eggshell, satin, flat, etc) I know the plaster of paris will make it matte, but do you have to start with a specific finish paint? Also, I've never used furniture wax....any certain brand or type that's best? Thank you so much for your help!
Andrea

fairykin said...

Hi Sharon,
What type of wax did you use? a paste, liquid, what brand?
Also, does it matter what kind of paint, satin, semi-gloss etc.?
Thanks so much

bec said...

I'm in love with this post and your blog....hugely inspiring!
Bec x

Annie said...

Sharon...thank you for your help with ascp. I am having a very difficult time trying to figure out how much plaster of paris to put into a gallon of paint. help! Thank you, Ann

Delton Taylor said...

Hi there, just getting into doing my own upcycling projects as a hobby and to hopefully make some money of my work. I am scouring the web to learn of recommended techniques, methods and advice which I can utilise to create great pieces.

Due to starting out and having a very limited budget for materials, I am always looking at ways I can create my own paints. Can you please tell me what sort of paint is best to use as the base? I have lots of quality matt eggshell paint that I got cheap from a charity shop that I am thinking would be ideal but just wanted other's thoughts.

Kind Regards

Delton Taylor said...

Also how good is the adherence to metal handles and hinges? would I need to prime wood and metal beforehand??

Kind Regards

Reduce, Reuse, Renewed said...

This recipe works GREAT! Its the only chalk paint recipe I use. I've applied it to three different projects and they turned out great. @ were for toys for my kids. I did add a coat of polyurethane on top after it cured but I still like that the chalk paint is more durable than regular paint...especially for the kids toys. Thanks for posting this! Gave you full credit in each post where I used your paint.

Patty said...

You are amazing with the chalk painting. I want to come back and read more as I want to learn real bad. Thanks for visiting me!

Nicole at NicolinaPicolina said...

Beautiful Hutch, I love the Lotus Leaf color

River Valley Revivals said...

Hi, Great post!! Thanks for the inspiration! I want to try to make my own Chalk Paint, but I am having trouble finding Pre-mixed Plaster of Paris. Do you know if the powder works just as well? If not, any suggestions where I can buy the pre-mixed? Or order it on-line?

lina chapman said...

Why on earth have a blog with a comments section and not bother to answer people's questions?

Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co. said...

Why on earth ask a question when you are a no-reply commentor? Sorry, I couldn't resist! ... I have found that very few people ever take the time to return to a blog post to read the answer to their questions. It's much more effective to reply to each question directly. And I often edit posts with answers to fequently asked questions. ... If you've spent any time here, you know that I take great care to not only answer questions, but reply to almost all comments, at least as much as time allows!

Rsimmons said...

Could you tell me what type of wax you recommend?

Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co. said...

I'm still on a quest to find the perfect wax! Minwax are SCJohnson are very inexpensive, easy to appy and readily available. And I'd hard pretty good results with both of them. Fiddes & Sons is a nice softer wax, but hard to find. I found the Annie Sloan wax took forever to dry. As of today, I've only used Miss Mustard Seed's soft wax once, but I liked it. It too is hard to find in my area. I like to use products I can find locally. Having to order online can be very inconvenient when you are in the middle of a project!

Fleur delishy said...

Love this, thanks for sharing! Hutch came out lovely too! ~LK

Carol Bartlett said...

Lovely job, but I think I would like it even more had you not painted the hardware.

Those Crazy Scotts said...

What a beautiful color! Thanks for the tips. Ladies, I have been having great luck lately at the local yard sales vs stores for my pieces. I bought a roll top desk yesterday for $20.00 and a beautiful wardrobe a few weeks before for $20.00 too.

Lee Kuhn said...

I tried this recipe with 2 different types of paint, the first worked very well but the 2nd I mixed with sico door and trim. I made it the day before, shook the next day like I did first batch but by time done painting that day the bottom half was hard and the paint had small chips in it. Darn it
not sure if it was the type of paint? or leaving over night? or not conitnuing to stir.. suggestions?

somecrafty said...

Just stunning! I tried your method for making chalk paint today. It was so simple and easy! I'll be finishing up my piece this week and have more I want to paint.

~Angie

Adornment said...

How long does the paint store once mixed? I would prefer to mix a larger batch so I have it in a pinch if it stores well. Annie Sloan and Cece Caldwell paints have a shelf life of about 1 year.

Adornment said...

How long does the paint store once mixed? I would prefer to mix a larger batch so I have it in a pinch if it stores well. Annie Sloan and Cece Caldwell paints have a shelf life of about 1 year.

Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co. said...

I prefer to mix up a fresh batch each day I plan to paint. It tends to thicken up overnight. This is not something you want to mix up in large batches. ... Happy painting!

Lolly Jane said...

Love this recipe. Have been using it for a few projects and it's perfect. I'll link back to you when I get around to posting it :D

THANKS for sharing! XO

James Aceves said...

That is a great idea and I loved the very clear directions.I will be giving that a try.



door hinges

Victoria Delamarter said...

Not sure why you have 4 equal lines on a container, if we are only using the first line for plaster of paris? Are we to fill water to next line and then paint to one after that....help please

Victoria Delamarter said...

Not sure why you have 4 equal lines on a container, if we are only using the first line for plaster of paris? Are we to fill water to next line and then paint to one after that....help please

Unknown said...

Instead of waxing... could I use poly over it?

Isabella watson said...

Great post! Thanks for sharing this information. I gained quite a lot of knowledge after reading your blog thank you.

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Melia said...

Love this piece! I'm curious how you got the stuff off of the glass? thanks!

Unknown said...

Where can I buy Plaster of Paris in small amounts for a reasonable price? Some of what I found says exterior... does it matter?

Unknown said...

Where can I buy Plaster of Paris in small amounts for a reasonable price? Some of what I found says exterior... does it matter?

Jason Aguilar said...

I used your version of chalk paint today and it worked perfect. I did add a little more water and I mixed (shook?) it up in a quart size mason jar...came out super smooth.
Thanks so much.
Jason

Kristin said...

What wax do you use afterward? Where can I find it? Thanks for posting this!

Kristin said...

What wax do you use afterward? Where can I find it? Thanks for posting this!

Rachelle Morris said...

I have heard that not all DIY recipes are as good as the real thing so was nervous about trying any, but if a few of you have been using this one for a while, then that is great! Have you done fabric as well though? And how did you find it after? Did you need to sand it or was it crunchy feeling at all? What about floors? Sorry so many questions. I am going to be redoing a lot of different things here in the next month or so and would love to get more info. before I start. Thanks! :). I just finished reading your blog and went through most of the comments/ questions. I am wondering about sanding. Do you need to? Even with furniture? And the wax. Is this necessary or only for a certain look? Thanks again. :)

Unknown said...

Hello Again!

Did you prime first? Is it necessary?

I will hopefully be making the chalk paint soon and when done with be finishing with a satin water based poly. Will let you know how it turns out.

Connie@Connie Nikiforoff Designs said...

Really gorgeous! (Visiting from Hometalk) I use the same 'recipe' but usually I'm using left over latex paint and mix up my own colors ;-) Gosh ya gotta love that DIY! Pretty pretty furniture piece!

Kadora said...

Love your instructions, I was searching forever for a DIY recipe that made sense to me! Tried it last night on our faux brick backsplash...wasn't expecting such a "matte" feel (not sure what I was expecting!). I really want to paint a desk I found at a garage sale but I'm not sure I like that feel...do you ever use it on something like a desk that you'd write on? Is the waxing what gives it a smoother feel? I can't decide...I don't want the chalk feel on my workspace, but wax sounds (to my unexperienced mind) like it would make it too "soft" to be usable. Please help! :-) Thanks again for the great tutorial!

Unknown said...

I made a batch last night... I used my immersion blender to mix the water/plaster and then to mix the plaster/paint. It came out like stabilized whipping cream. Is that the textures I was going for? I painted a small board and it went on well but I guess I expected it to be more chalky feeling. Did I over mix? Is it too thick?

Unknown said...

Maybe it was because I used dry plaster of Paris??? Now I am confused.

Jassica Mody said...

I love it!! What a cute project, it is so perfect. Thanks for sharing such a great tutorial with us! my blog at Curtain designs

kellov said...

Just my quick 2¢ worth-If you have a Hobby Lobby nearby,I am certain they have plaster of paris.An added plus is the 40% off coupon they have every week,if it's not already on sale. If you missed it they nearly always have extra at the store. If you are not near a Hobby Lobby,almost any arts and crafts store should have it. I have came across it at Wal-Mart,as well. I've never tried chalk painting,but absolutely adore the look Thank you for your article. Your piece turned out beautifully.

Sheryl Red Tin Inn said...

Thank you for the great information. I am tired of paying high prices for chalk paint along with the shipping. Your post is winner because it makes the pocketbook go farther. Also I am glad that you use a wax that can be purchase at a diy store. I will admit I love Johnsons Paste wax..easy and is ready to buff quickly. The smell is strong but does not linger....I appreciate your efforts Oh..and I love the china cabinet....
Sheryl
Red Tin Inn

Judy Brocato said...

I too wondered about the 4 lines? 1 line for the plaster, a little water? and then the next line paint? or fill with paint to the top line? thanks

Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co. said...

For Judy - the four lines are just to help judge 1 part Plaster of Paris to 3 parts paint. The water dissolves the Plaster of Paris and you'll still be at or near the first line. Then add three parts paint. I've been doing this for years now and I don't measure anymore. You really don't have to be too precise.

metonymist said...

Just came across this, thanks for the post. I notice you removed the gold [leaf?] stripes from the glass, was there a simple method you used?

Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co. said...

For mtonymist ... yes the removal of the gold trim on the glass was a quick and easy fix with a little paint scraper razor blade I picked up for just a few dollars at the paint store. It's a nifty little gadget with a cover and a built-in supply of blades.

Mollie said...

Thank you so much! I, too, had questions about what paint you used, but I realized I could just click on your image and see exactly the type of paint-- Interior Satin Enamel Paint and Primer
I'm going to give it a go! Thanks

Unknown said...

Hello, so excited to try your recipe. I used it today, painting my 36 year old baby crib. The first side was lovely then with the second I found my plaster of Paris had hardened in the bottom if container. I stirred and stirred and strained it, but still have grit. What did I do wrong? I used Behr flat paint/primer and dry Plaster of Paris. Help please, two more sides to go.

Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co. said...

For Unknown, Did you add water to the Plaster of Paris? It should be completely dissolved before adding your paint. I occasionally stir throughout the painting process, but have never had the POP harden. I don't think the mix can be saved. But I hope you give it another try!

Unknown said...

Yes I did. It was very smooth, perhaps not thin enough. I painted the first end of the crib and started on the first side, I dipped my brush in and hit a "rock" in the bottom. I used a screwdriver to chip it up, stirred it all up as much as possible then strained it. As I proceeded to paint I was noticing grit, unlike the first end, which was smooth as could be. Very disappointing....

Kathie gillaspie said...

have you used this recipe in a sprayer?

Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co. said...

For Kathie ... I have used homemade chalk paint in a sprayer and it worked really well!